Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

[Update: The CRAN package “jvmr” has been replaced by a new package “rscala”. Rather than completely re-write this post, I’ve just created a github gist containing a new function, breezeInterpreter(), which works similarly to the function breezeInit() in this post. Usage information is given at the top of the gist.]

Introduction

In the previous post I showed how to call Scala code from R using sbt and jvmr. The approach described in that post is the one I would recommend for any non-trivial piece of Scala code – mixing up code from different languages in the same source code file is not a good strategy in general. That said, for very small snippets of code, it can sometimes be convenient to inline Scala code directly into an R source code file. The canonical example of this is a computationally intensive algorithm being prototyped in R which has a slow inner loop. If the inner loop can be recoded in a few lines of Scala, it would be nice to just inline this directly into the R code without having to create a separate Scala project. The CRAN package jvmr provides a very simple and straightforward way to do this. However, as discussed in the last post, most Scala code for statistical computing (even short and simple code) is likely to rely on Breeze for special functions, probability distributions, non-uniform random number generation, numerical linear algebra, etc. In this post we will see how to use sbt in order to make sure that the Breeze library and all of its dependencies are downloaded and cached, and to provide a correct classpath with which to initialise a jvmr scalaInterpreter session.

Setting up

Configuring your system to be able to inline Scala Breeze code is very easy. You just need to install Java, R and sbt. Then install the CRAN R package jvmr. At this point you have everything you need except for the R function breezeInit, given at the end of this post. I’ve deferred the function to the end of the post as it is a bit ugly, and the details of it are not important. All it does is get sbt to ensure that Breeze is correctly downloaded and cached and then starts a scalaInterpreter with Breeze on the classpath. With this function available, we can use it within an R session as the following R session illustrates:

> b=breezeInit()
> b['import breeze.stats.distributions._']
NULL
> b['Poisson(10).sample(20).toArray']
 [1] 13 14 13 10  7  6 15 14  5 10 14 11 15  8 11 12  6  7  5  7
> summary(b['Gamma(3,2).sample(10000).toArray'])
   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
 0.2124  3.4630  5.3310  5.9910  7.8390 28.5200 
> 

So we see that Scala Breeze code can be inlined directly into an R session, and if we are careful about return types, have the results of Scala expressions automatically unpack back into convenient R data structures.

Summary

In this post I have shown how easy it is to inline Scala Breeze code into R using sbt in conjunction with the CRAN package jvmr. This has many potential applications, with the most obvious being the desire to recode slow inner loops from R to Scala. This should give performance quite comparable with alternatives such as Rcpp, with the advantage being that you get to write beautiful, elegant, functional Scala code instead of horrible, ugly, imperative C++ code! 😉

The breezeInit function

The actual breezeInit() function is given below. It is a little ugly, but very simple. It is obviously easy to customise for different libraries and library versions as required. All of the hard work is done by sbt which must be installed and on the default system path in order for this function to work.

breezeInit<-function()
{
  library(jvmr)
  sbtStr="name := \"tmp\"

version := \"0.1\"

libraryDependencies  ++= Seq(
            \"org.scalanlp\" %% \"breeze\" % \"0.10\",
            \"org.scalanlp\" %% \"breeze-natives\" % \"0.10\"
)

resolvers ++= Seq(
            \"Sonatype Snapshots\" at \"https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/\",
            \"Sonatype Releases\" at \"https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/releases/\"
)

scalaVersion := \"2.11.2\"

lazy val printClasspath = taskKey[Unit](\"Dump classpath\")

printClasspath := {
  (fullClasspath in Runtime value) foreach {
    e => print(e.data+\"!\")
  }
}
"
  tmps=file(file.path(tempdir(),"build.sbt"),"w")
  cat(sbtStr,file=tmps)
  close(tmps)
  owd=getwd()
  setwd(tempdir())
  cpstr=system2("sbt","printClasspath",stdout=TRUE)
  cpst=cpstr[length(cpstr)]
  cpsp=strsplit(cpst,"!")[[1]]
  cp=cpsp[2:(length(cpsp)-1)]
  si=scalaInterpreter(cp,use.jvmr.class.path=FALSE)
  setwd(owd)
  si
}
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Inlining JAGS models in R scripts for rjags

JAGS (Just Another Gibbs Sampler) is a general purpose MCMC engine similar to WinBUGS and OpenBUGS. I have a slight preference for JAGS as it is free and portable, works well on Linux, and interfaces well with R. It is tempting to write a tutorial introduction to JAGS and the corresponding R package, rjags, but there is a lot of material freely available on-line already, so it isn’t really necessary. If you are new to JAGS, I suggest starting with Getting Started with JAGS, rjags, and Bayesian Modelling. In this post I want to focus specifically on the problem of inlining JAGS models in R scripts as it can be very useful, and is usually skipped in introductory material.

JAGS and rjags on Ubuntu Linux

On recent versions of Ubuntu, assuming that R is already installed, the simplest way to install JAGS and rjags is using the command

sudo apt-get install jags r-cran-rjags

Now rjags is a CRAN package, so it can be installed in the usual way with install.packages("rjags"). However, taking JAGS and rjags direct from the Ubuntu repos should help to ensure that the versions of JAGS and rjags are in sync, which is a good thing.

Toy model

For this post, I will use a trivial toy example of inference for the mean and precision of a normal random sample. That is, we will assume data

X_i \sim N(\mu,1/\tau),\quad i=1,2,\ldots n,

with priors on \mu and \tau of the form

\tau\sim Ga(a,b),\quad \mu \sim N(c,1/d).

Separate model file

The usual way to fit this model in R using rjags is to first create a separate file containing the model

  model {
    for (i in 1:n) {
      x[i]~dnorm(mu,tau)
    }
    mu~dnorm(cc,d)
    tau~dgamma(a,b)
  }

Then, supposing that this file is called jags1.jags, an R session to fit the model could be constructed as follows:

require(rjags)
x=rnorm(15,25,2)
data=list(x=x,n=length(x))
hyper=list(a=3,b=11,cc=10,d=1/100)
init=list(mu=0,tau=1)
model=jags.model("jags1.jags",data=append(data,hyper), inits=init)
update(model,n.iter=100)
output=coda.samples(model=model,variable.names=c("mu", "tau"), n.iter=10000, thin=1)
print(summary(output))
plot(output)

This is all fine, and it can be very useful to have the model declared in a separate file, especially if the model is large and complex, and you might want to use it from outside R. However, very often for simple models it can be quite inconvenient to have the model separate from the R script which runs it. In particular, people often have issues with naming files correctly, making sure R is looking in the correct directory, moving the model with the R script, etc. So it would be nice to be able to just inline the JAGS model within an R script, to keep the model, the data, and the analysis all together in one place.

Using a temporary file

What we want to do is declare the JAGS model within a text string inside an R script and then somehow pass this into the call to jags.model(). The obvious way to do this is to write the string to a text file, and then pass the name of that text file into jags.model(). This works fine, but some care needs to be taken to make sure this works in a generic platform independent way. For example, you need to write to a file that you know doesn’t exist in a directory that is writable using a filename that is valid on the OS on which the script is being run. For this purpose R has an excellent little function called tempfile() which solves exactly this naming problem. It should always return the name of a file which does not exist in a writable directly within the standard temporary file location on the OS on which R is being run. This function is exceedingly useful for all kinds of things, but doesn’t seem to be very well known by newcomers to R. Using this we can construct a stand-alone R script to fit the model as follows:

require(rjags)
x=rnorm(15,25,2)
data=list(x=x,n=length(x))
hyper=list(a=3,b=11,cc=10,d=1/100)
init=list(mu=0,tau=1)
modelstring="
  model {
    for (i in 1:n) {
      x[i]~dnorm(mu,tau)
    }
    mu~dnorm(cc,d)
    tau~dgamma(a,b)
  }
"
tmpf=tempfile()
tmps=file(tmpf,"w")
cat(modelstring,file=tmps)
close(tmps)
model=jags.model(tmpf,data=append(data,hyper), inits=init)
update(model,n.iter=100)
output=coda.samples(model=model,variable.names=c("mu", "tau"), n.iter=10000, thin=1)
print(summary(output))
plot(output)

Now, although there is a file containing the model temporarily involved, the script is stand-alone and portable.

Using a text connection

The solution above works fine, but still involves writing a file to disk and reading it back in again, which is a bit pointless in this case. We can solve this by using another under-appreciated R function, textConnection(). Many R functions which take a file as an argument will work fine if instead passed a textConnection object, and the rjags function jags.model() is no exception. Here, instead of writing the model string to disk, we can turn it into a textConnection object and then pass that directly into jags.model() without ever actually writing the model file to disk. This is faster, neater and cleaner. An R session which takes this approach is given below.

require(rjags)
x=rnorm(15,25,2)
data=list(x=x,n=length(x))
hyper=list(a=3,b=11,cc=10,d=1/100)
init=list(mu=0,tau=1)
modelstring="
  model {
    for (i in 1:n) {
      x[i]~dnorm(mu,tau)
    }
    mu~dnorm(cc,d)
    tau~dgamma(a,b)
  }
"
model=jags.model(textConnection(modelstring), data=append(data,hyper), inits=init)
update(model,n.iter=100)
output=coda.samples(model=model,variable.names=c("mu", "tau"), n.iter=10000, thin=1)
print(summary(output))
plot(output)

This is my preferred way to use rjags. Note again that textConnection objects have many and varied uses and applications that have nothing to do with rjags.

Faster Gibbs sampling MCMC from within R

Introduction

This post follows on from the previous post on Gibbs sampling in various languages. In that post a simple Gibbs sampler was implemented in various languages, and speeds were compared. It was seen that R is very slow for iterative simulation algorithms characteristic of MCMC methods such as the Gibbs sampler. Statically typed languages such as C/C++ and Java were seen to be fastest for this type of algorithm. Since many statisticians like to use R for most of their work, there is natural interest in the possibility of extending R by calling simulation algorithms written in other languages. It turns out to be straightforward to call C, C++ and Java from within R, so this post will look at how this can be done, and exactly how fast the different options turn out to be. The post draws heavily on my previous posts on calling C from R and calling Java from R, as well as Dirk Eddelbuettel’s post on calling C++ from R, and it may be helpful to consult these posts for further details.

Languages

R

We will start with the simple pure R version of the Gibbs sampler, and use this as our point of reference for understanding the benefits of re-coding in other languages. The background to the problem was given in the previous post and so won’t be repeated here. The code can be given as follows:

gibbs<-function(N=50000,thin=1000)
{
	mat=matrix(0,ncol=2,nrow=N)
	x=0
	y=0
	for (i in 1:N) {
		for (j in 1:thin) {
			x=rgamma(1,3,y*y+4)
			y=rnorm(1,1/(x+1),1/sqrt(2*x+2))
		}
		mat[i,]=c(x,y)
	}
	names(mat)=c("x","y")
	mat
}

This code works perfectly, but is very slow. It takes 458.9 seconds on my very fast laptop (details given in previous post).

C

Let us now see how we can introduce a new function, gibbsC into R, which works in exactly the same way as gibbs, but actually calls on compiled C code to do all of the work. First we need the C code in a file called gibbs.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <R.h>
#include <Rmath.h>

void gibbs(int *Np,int *thinp,double *xvec,double *yvec)
{
  int i,j;
  int N=*Np,thin=*thinp;
  GetRNGstate();
  double x=0;
  double y=0;
  for (i=0;i<N;i++) {
    for (j=0;j<thin;j++) {
      x=rgamma(3.0,1.0/(y*y+4));
      y=rnorm(1.0/(x+1),1.0/sqrt(2*x+2));
    }
    xvec[i]=x; yvec[i]=y;
  }
  PutRNGstate();
}

This can be compiled with R CMD SHLIB gibbs.c. We can load it into R and wrap it up so that it is easy to use with the following code:

dyn.load(file.path(".",paste("gibbs",.Platform$dynlib.ext,sep="")))
gibbsC<-function(n=50000,thin=1000)
{
  tmp=.C("gibbs",as.integer(n),as.integer(thin),
                x=as.double(1:n),y=as.double(1:n))
  mat=cbind(tmp$x,tmp$y)
  colnames(mat)=c("x","y")
  mat
}

The new function gibbsC works just like gibbs, but takes just 12.1 seconds to run. This is roughly 40 times faster than the pure R version, which is a big deal.

Note that using the R inline package, it is possible to directly inline the C code into the R source code. We can do this with the following R code:

require(inline)
code='
  int i,j;
  int N=*Np,thin=*thinp;
  GetRNGstate();
  double x=0;
  double y=0;
  for (i=0;i<N;i++) {
    for (j=0;j<thin;j++) {
      x=rgamma(3.0,1.0/(y*y+4));
      y=rnorm(1.0/(x+1),1.0/sqrt(2*x+2));
    }
    xvec[i]=x; yvec[i]=y;
  }
  PutRNGstate();'
gibbsCin<-cfunction(sig=signature(Np="integer",thinp="integer",xvec="numeric",yvec="numeric"),body=code,includes="#include <Rmath.h>",language="C",convention=".C")
gibbsCinline<-function(n=50000,thin=1000)
{
  tmp=gibbsCin(n,thin,rep(0,n),rep(0,n))
  mat=cbind(tmp$x,tmp$y)
  colnames(mat)=c("x","y")
  mat
}

This runs at the same speed as the code compiled separately, and is arguably a bit cleaner in this case. Personally I’m not a big fan of inlining code unless it is something really very simple. If there is one thing that we have learned from the murky world of web development, it is that little good comes from mixing up different languages in the same source code file!

C++

We can also inline C++ code into R using the inline and Rcpp packages. The code below originates from Sanjog Misra, and was discussed in the post by Dirk Eddelbuettel mentioned at the start of this post.

require(Rcpp)
require(inline)

gibbscode = '
int N = as<int>(n);
int thn = as<int>(thin);
int i,j;
RNGScope scope;
NumericVector xs(N),ys(N);
double x=0;
double y=0;
for (i=0;i<N;i++) {
  for (j=0;j<thn;j++) {
    x = ::Rf_rgamma(3.0,1.0/(y*y+4));
    y= ::Rf_rnorm(1.0/(x+1),1.0/sqrt(2*x+2));
  }
  xs(i) = x;
  ys(i) = y;
}
return Rcpp::DataFrame::create( Named("x")= xs, Named("y") = ys);
'

RcppGibbsFn <- cxxfunction( signature(n="int", thin = "int"),
                              gibbscode, plugin="Rcpp")

RcppGibbs <- function(N=50000,thin=1000)
{
	RcppGibbsFn(N,thin)
}

This version of the sampler runs in 12.4 seconds, just a little bit slower than the C version.

Java

It is also quite straightforward to call Java code from within R using the rJava package. The following code

import java.util.*;
import cern.jet.random.tdouble.*;
import cern.jet.random.tdouble.engine.*;

class GibbsR
{

    public static double[][] gibbs(int N,int thin,int seed)
    {
	DoubleRandomEngine rngEngine=new DoubleMersenneTwister(seed);
	Normal rngN=new Normal(0.0,1.0,rngEngine);
	Gamma rngG=new Gamma(1.0,1.0,rngEngine);
	double x=0,y=0;
	double[][] mat=new double[2][N];
	for (int i=0;i<N;i++) {
	    for (int j=0;j<thin;j++) {
		x=rngG.nextDouble(3.0,y*y+4);
		y=rngN.nextDouble(1.0/(x+1),1.0/Math.sqrt(2*x+2));
	    }
	    mat[0][i]=x; mat[1][i]=y;
	}
	return mat;
    }

}

can be compiled with javac GibbsR.java (assuming that Parallel COLT is in the classpath), and wrapped up from within an R session with

library(rJava)
.jinit()
obj=.jnew("GibbsR")

gibbsJ<-function(N=50000,thin=1000,seed=trunc(runif(1)*1e6))
{
    result=.jcall(obj,"[[D","gibbs",as.integer(N),as.integer(thin),as.integer(seed))
    mat=sapply(result,.jevalArray)
    colnames(mat)=c("x","y")
    mat
}

This code runs in 10.7 seconds. Yes, that’s correct. Yes, the Java code is faster than both the C and C++ code! This really goes to show that Java is now an excellent option for numerically intensive work such as this. However, before any C/C++ enthusiasts go apoplectic, I should explain why Java turns out to be faster here, as the comparison is not quite fair… In the C and C++ code, use was made of the internal R random number generation routines, which are relatively slow compared to many modern numerical library implementations. In the Java code, I used Parallel COLT for random number generation, as it isn’t straightforward to call the R generators from Java code. It turns out that the COLT generators are faster than the R generators, and that is why Java turns out to be faster here…

C+GSL

Of course we do not have to use the R random number generators within our C code. For example, we could instead call on the GSL generators, using the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <gsl/gsl_rng.h>
#include <gsl/gsl_randist.h>
#include <R.h>

void gibbsGSL(int *Np,int *thinp,int *seedp,double *xvec,double *yvec)
{
  int i,j;
  int N=*Np,thin=*thinp,seed=*seedp;
  gsl_rng *r = gsl_rng_alloc(gsl_rng_mt19937);
  gsl_rng_set(r,seed);
  double x=0;
  double y=0;
  for (i=0;i<N;i++) {
    for (j=0;j<thin;j++) {
      x=gsl_ran_gamma(r,3.0,1.0/(y*y+4));
      y=1.0/(x+1)+gsl_ran_gaussian(r,1.0/sqrt(2*x+2));
    }
    xvec[i]=x; yvec[i]=y;
  }
}

It can be compiled with R CMD SHLIB -lgsl -lgslcblas gibbsGSL.c, and then called as for the regular C version. This runs in 8.0 seconds, which is noticeably faster than the Java code, but probably not “enough” faster to make it an important factor to consider in language choice.

Summary

In this post I’ve shown that it is relatively straightforward to call code written in C, C++ or Java from within R, and that this can give very significant performance gains relative to pure R code. All of the options give fairly similar performance gains. I showed that in the case of this particular example, the “obvious” Java code is actually slightly faster than the “obvious” C or C++ code, and explained why, and how to make the C version slightly faster by using the GSL. The post by Dirk shows how to call the GSL generators from the C++ version, which I haven’t replicated here.