Statistical computing languages at the RSS

On Friday the Royal Statistical Society hosted a meeting on Statistical computing languages, organised by my colleague Colin Gillespie. Four languages were presented at the meeting: Python, Scala, Matlab and Julia. I presented the talk on Scala. The slides I presented are available, in addition to the code examples and instructions on how to run them, in a public github repo I have created. The talk mainly covered material I have discussed in various previous posts on this blog. What was new was the emphasis on how easy it is to use and run Scala code, and the inclusion of complete examples and instructions on how to run them on any platform with a JVM installed. I also discussed some of the current limitations of Scala as an environment for interactive statistical data analysis and visualisation, and how these limitations could be overcome with a little directed effort. Colin suggested that all of the speakers covered a couple of examples (linear regression and a Monte Carlo integral) in “their” languages, and he provided an R solution. It is interesting to see the examples in the five different languages side by side for comparison purposes. Colin is collecting together all of the material relating to the meeting in a combined github repo, which should fill out over the next few days.

For other Scala posts on this blog, see all of my posts with a “scala” tag.

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I am Professor of Stochastic Modelling within the School of Mathematics & Statistics at Newcastle University, UK. I am also a computational systems biologist.

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